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Job Hunting Tips – Crafting Your Resume as a Student

How students can set up a resume using schoolwork as job experience

Landing a job without years of prior experience is a struggle for students and recent college graduates alike. Use July’s job hunting tips to learn how to craft a resume that will get you the job!

Transferable skills:

Transferable skills are skills or characteristics you possess that are useful in a variety of jobs. In a diverse job market, employers all value traits such as organization, communication, dependability, and more. Include any relevant college coursework and any long-term projects you may have done in those classes. This can be used to exemplify teamwork and organization. Leadership and teamwork skills can also be gained through sports and bands. Therefore, those are also valuable assets to your transferable skill set. Lastly, in this digital age it’s important to include any computer certifications you may have as an example of your technology literacy. 

Extra curricular activities:

College campuses offer a plethora of extra curricular activities for the students to participate in. This includes opportunities such as student government, school newspapers, greek life, and academic clubs. While these alone are not examples of experience relevant to the job you’re seeking, the work you did and the positions you held for these organizations are. Put on your resume any events you planned for clubs, positions like treasurer or president of greek life or student government, or articles you wrote for the school newspaper or magazine. If relevant to the job you’re apply to it shows you have some knowledge and experience of the skillset required or the communication skills to get elected and then be a leader of people. 

Volunteer work:

Depending on the type, volunteer work can count towards your transferable skill set or your specific career path. When searching for volunteer work, make a list of the specific tasks and goals you hope to accomplish. This is helpful when searching for organizations that will give you a leg up in exactly what you hope your career will lead to in the future. Employers will be impressed to know you’ve been honing your skillset and actively working towards career goals out of a serious commitment to the field, rather than commitment to a paycheck. 

For more on how your volunteer work can help you achieve your career goals, check out the following article [http://principlestrategies.com/job-hunting-tips-april-2019/]

Relevancy is key:

The most important thing to keep in mind is to keep your experience relevant to the job you’re applying for. Miscellaneous and unrelated part time jobs may give off the impression of commitment and a strong work ethic. However, most employers won’t view them as serious job experience because there is no relation to the work required of the job. This goes for school work and volunteer work as well. The point of a resume is to convince an employer you’re the right person for that specific job, not just a job in general. Make sure everything on your resume is a strong claim to support your answer to the most important questions, ‘why are YOU the right person for this job?’ and ‘why should we hire YOU?’